Makoko_Projects | architecture projects

Small-scale design interventions for impoverished informal settlements

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Water Hyacinths harvesting

Observation: During the rainy season, a water weed known as water hyacinth populates the lagoon and clogs up the city’s drainage. It is a known nuisance in the city, and although there are some adavantages to having water hyacinth in the waters (the absorption of pollutants being one of them) downsides are that it encourages the breeding of mosquitoes. How can we keep the water weeds away from the waters beneath the dwellings?

Proposal: There are many possible uses for water hyacinth. When dried, it can be woven into baskets, etc. It can be used to make compost and also used to feed livestock. The design of the water hyacinth harvesting baskets can be hung on the fence for the homeowners to collect the weed from the lagoon and hang to dry. This proposal hopes to create a culture of harvesting the hyacinths, supplying the various parties who might use the end product in exchange for cash. The fence mentioned in Project 1 will also act as a barrier to keep water hyacinths out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
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